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3D Printing. This type of printer that is a very powerful printer that can print and produce a three-dimensional product. 3D printers are widely used in various industries such as health, art, architecture, and other industries much. The materials used in the three-dimensional printers use special materials for three-dimensional printer. And media used for the manufacture of three-dimensional model is a special material, so can not use just any material.
How Do 3D Printers Work?
This is a broad question, which was partially explained in the section above. With that said, the best way to really understand how 3D printing works is to understand the various technologies involved. Similarly to the way that engines function based on some of the same principles as one another, but don’t all use gasoline or solar power, all 3D printers don’t use the same base technology, but still manage to accomplish the same basic tasks. Before we get into each of these individual technologies, however, one should understand the basic principles of transferring a 3D model on a computer screen to a .
The worldwide 3D printing industry is expected to grow from $3.07B in revenue in 2013 to $12.8B by 2018, and exceed $21B in worldwide revenue by 2020. As it evolves, 3D printing technology is destined to transform almost every major industry and change the way we live, work, and play in the future.
Medical industry
The outlook for medical use of 3D printing is evolving at an extremely rapid pace as specialists are beginning to utilize 3D printing in more advanced ways. Patients around the world are experiencing improved quality of care through 3D printed implants and prosthetics never before seen.
Bio-printing
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As of the early two-thousands 3D printing technology has been studied by biotech firms and academia for possible use in tissue engineering applications where organs and body parts are built using inkjet techniques. Layers of living cells are deposited onto a gel medium and slowly built up to form three dimensional structures. We refer to this field of research with the term: bio-printing.
The growth in utilisation of 3D printing in the aerospace and aviation industries can, for a large part, be derived from the developments in the metal additive manufacturing sector.
NASA for instance prints combustion chamber liners using selective laser melting and as of march 2015 the FAA cleared GE Aviation’s first 3D printed jet engine part to fly: a laser sintered housing for a compressor inlet temperature sensor.